Sunday, January 13, 2008

Benazir's Medical Report!


Kidding around the WWW last nite with my unusually slow and sick Streamyx and found this medical report which belong to the late Benazir Bhuto .....


Page 1 of 3

Page 2 of 3

Page 3 of 3


The bad news is, I could not understand a single damn thing about what the report says except the basic cause of her death is due to open head injury with depressed skull fracture, leading to Cardiopulmonary arrest. Come on... don't ask me what is Cardiopulmonary?! Maybe got something to do with the heart stop beating la... Bear with my stupidity, Please OK!
BTW, got this stuff from here...

ciao!

Saturday, January 12, 2008

Relaxing... In the way of Rumi!


I just stumbled upon this very beautiful poem of Rumi..

The Many Wines..

God has given us a dark wine so potent that,
drinking it, we leave the two worlds.

God has put into the form of hashish a power
to deliver the taster from self-consciousness.

God has made sleep so
that it erases every thought.

God made Majnun love Layla so much that
just her dog would cause confusion in him.

There are thousands of wines
that can take over our minds.

Don't think all ecstacies
are the same!

Jesus was lost in his love for God.
His donkey was drunk with barley.

Drink from the presence of saints,
not from those other jars.

Every object, every being,
is a jar full of delight.

Be a conoisseur,
and taste with caution.

Any wine will get you high.
Judge like a king, and choose the purest,

the ones unadulterated with fear,
or some urgency about "what's needed."

Drink the wine that moves you
as a camel moves when it's been untied,

and is just ambling about.

Mathnawi IV, 2683-96
The Essential Rumi, Coleman Barks

What a wonderful way of spending Saturday evening with Rumi's unconditional, universal love and divine ecstasy! A little bit about Rumi which I've taken from the book tittled Discourses of Rumi or Fihi Ma Fihi (It is What It Is) is posted below. On 06-09-2007, a day of commemoration is organized at UNESCO to celebrate the 800th anniversary of the birth of Rumi, one of the greatest poets, philosophers and scholars of the eastern civilization.

Recognized as perhaps the greatest mystical poet of Islam, Jalal al-Din Rumi (1207-1273) communicated something through his writing that has attracted spiritual seekers from almost every religion in the world, for hundreds of years. Even in his day, Rumi was sought out by merchants and kings, devout worshippers and rebellious seekers, famous scholars and common peasants, men and women. At his funeral, Muslims, Christians, Jews, Arabs, Persians, Turks and
Romans honored him. Listen to his call for seekers of truth:



Come, come, whoever you are.

Wanderer, worshipper, lover of leaving.

It doesn’t matter.

Ours is not a caravan of despair.

Come, even if you have broken your vow

a hundred times.

Come, yet again, come, come.



Rumi’s love and honor for all religious traditions was not always popular in his day, and often provoked criticism from the more dogmatic. A story is told that one such public challenge came from a Muslim dignitary, Qonavi, who confronted Rumi before an audience. “You claim to be at one with 72 religious sects,” said Qonavi, “but the Jews cannot agree with the Christians, and the Christians cannot agree with Muslims. If they cannot agree with each other, how could you agree with them all?” To this Rumi answered, “Yes, you are right, I agree with you too.”



Although kings were his followers, Rumi’s critics could never understand why Rumi’s greatest
love and dedication went to what they called, “the tailors, the cloth-sellers, and the petty shopkeepers - uncouth and uncultured ruffians.” Yet even amongst these, his dearest companions, Rumi allowed no vanity.



The story is told that one day, while Rumi was in deep contemplation, surrounded by his disciples, a drunkard walked in shouting and stumbling. The man staggered toward Rumi, and then fell on him. To Rumi’s followers such a disgrace of their teacher was intolerable, and they rose as one to rush the ignorant fool. Rumi stopped them with his raised hand, saying, “I thought this intruder was the one who was intoxicated, but now I see it is not he, but my own students who are drunk!”



There are thousands who believe that Rumi’s presence (baraka) still exists today, and still teaches. If this is true, it is certainly largely due to the remarkable vitality that can be found in his writings and poetry, and a relevancy they contain that reaches to our inner core. Rumi’s poetry has captured the hearts of spiritual seekers around the world because of its depth and beauty. His verses sketch out the whole panorama of life, from human sorrow and devotion, to the universal breadth of God’s hidden plan. His poetry seems fathomless and endless.



Rumi has also left to us another manuscript that is not so well known - the collection of discourses given at the gatherings with his students. It Is What It Is (Fihi ma Fihi) is a record of these spiritual discussions that often followed music and dance, the reciting of sacred poems and phrases, and the now famous Whirling Dervish exercise that Rumi originated to enliven and bring spiritual opening to the rather somber people of Konya, Turkey, in his day.


For all those spiritual seekers out there, Rumi says ' Come, come, whoever you are, Ours is not a caravan of despair'

ciao!

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